Not long ago, I wrote about how I had to reset our TiVo Premiere to get suggestions working again. It worked great - suggestions came back, for the first time in months. Essentially the first time since we had had the unit.

The problem is that they soon went away again. I was about to scream. I would have pulled out all of my hair, but I really don't have any. So I went back to the drawing board.

I didn't want to go through all that process again, especially since I had just done it, and I figured that I was close, so I started thinking about all that I had heard previously. One thing that kept coming up was the timer. Apparently if you put your tuning adapter on a timer, it would bring back suggestions.

Back in late October, we decided to finally take the plunge with a TiVo Premiere. While we have had a TiVo for a while - and in fact have had two for some time now - the writing is now on the wall that we'll need to upgrade at some point to be able to pull in HD channels, so we figured now was a good time.

The Premiere made the choice a bit easier to swallow, as we could use just about any combination to get our channels: The existing analog cable, a cable card and/or an over-the-air (OTA) antenna. Life was good as long as we kept the analog cable, and even with the OTA antenna or a cable card. Unfortunately, when we added the tuning adapter (required by Time Warner Cable), suggestions stopped cold and though both TWC and TiVo were polite, neither could help get them going again.

Not too long ago, the Barnes and Noble Nook HD created quite a stir when the company announced that it would get the Play Store installed natively - this means that instead of trying to go up against Amazon and the Fire by creating its own ecosystem, the Nook would now be more akin to a regular Android tablet. Not exactly an Android tablet, but almost. And what's more, you didn't have to root the tablet in order to get the tablet connect to Google services.

The stir became even more interesting when the company dropped the prices from $229 to $179 and most recently to $149 (this is for the 16GB model). The Nook HD+ has had similar drops, but that strange dongle thing on the corner meant that I really didn't want one of those, even with the larger screen. Regardless, I decided to take the plunge.

A few days ago, I discussed the importance of continuity - generally as it related to movies and television. But continuity is important in applications, too - perhaps even more so.

Let's take a look at LinkedIn as one example. For a long time, LinkedIn has offered recommendations, but those are free-form endorsements, and as such they are not as easily searched and indexed, so the company decided to add "skills" to profiles. You can add skills yourself to your profile - as many as 50 individual skills that you believe represent your skill set.

There is a (somewhat outdated) SBS 2003 server on our network, and as we have discovered, the License Logging Service keeps wanting to restart. It is generally not possible to stop it for any length of time. Even disabling it doesn't work - it keeps coming back on. It isn't that we're trying to get around any licensing requirements, but we are trying to upgrade to a new server, and it seems that SBS doesn't want any part of that process.

Luckily there is actually a way to stop it, get rid of the warnings and keep SBS from complaining.

Enough talk about government. Instead, let's look at software. Specifically, why does it have to be so dang complicated? Take updates. It has become fairly commonplace to get them. If you use Windows, there is even a utility helpfully called Windows Update. On a regular basis, it provides updates to Windows - or something. Generally we have no idea what it updates, but we are simply to sit back and suffer through updates (and often the associated restarts). As an aside, I have been working in this industry long enough that I recall when we were told that installations and updates would not require as many reboots. I can only imagine what it would be like if it required more. But I digress.

As a recent gift, we passed down a laptop to one of our kids. Don't give me that look. There is nothing wrong such a thing. The laptop is perfectly fine for regular use, and in fact should serve him just fine for a while, and means we don't have to go out and buy a new one.

I noticed the other day - okay, it has probably been a couple of months and I'm just getting around to addressing the problem - that Quicken has started to miscalculated the principal and interest on a loan (specifically a mortgage - I don't know if it's a problem on all loans).

So I did the first thing most people will do: I searched online for the solution. The most common suggestion was to remove the loan and add a new one. While that will work, it means at best that you get a new loan, and I don't like that. It's messy.

Luckily, there is another answer.

Another week, another software problem. But this one isn't coming from Microsoft. No, this time it is Logitech who is causing issues.

Though I waffle between keyboards from time to time, my mouse is almost always Logitech, because they are just so comfortable. These days it is really difficult for me to use anything else. And that means that I am almost always using - or installing - their SetPoint software.

While TiVoToGo (TTG) is not the most reliable piece of software out there, and often just being able to transfer shows from one TiVo to another is much more useful, there are times when being able to save shows to a computer for later retrieval is a nice feature.

Unfortunately it seems that more and more often, this error message comes up and getting it to go away is a royal pain. So what do you do when you get the message "there are no tivo dvrs available on the network"? Other than panic, I mean?

It's been a long time coming, but I've finally decided to give up on WS_FTP. It started when I kept running into the Failed to Load OpenPGP Keys from Keyrings message last year. It isn't a bad message, it's just one of those things that really irritates me. It came up every time I started the software and I couldn't get rid of it. Then it went away and I forgot about it, but I would remember it every time I went to start up again. I would dread starting the application. It's a shame, really, because I had been using the software for a really long time.

Even though I found a solution to the problem, it had become time to move on. I had just grown up from the simplistic software that had carried me for so long, and it was time to find a new utility for my FTP needs. More importantly than the message that had dogged me for months and months was the fact that FTP was born of a time when I didn't really care - or really think - about security, and now I tend to think about it all the time. So I wanted to approach it from that angle instead.

Now that we've taken a look at getting a handle on our email spam, it's important to try and figure out how to really get on top of it. Sure, we can manage the spam process, and try to make sure that it doesn't get the better of us, but to make the most of it, it is important that we understand how email works to get the most out of the process. Since I use pair Networks, this will naturally look at it from that angle, but much of this can apply to any service.

First, of course, you have to be aware of the spam that you are receiving. We have already talked about that. But then you have to make sure to do everything in your power to keep from receiving more of it. While I know there are lots of people who swear by GMail for it's effectiveness in fighting spam, I have to say that I really don't find it any better than any other tool. You just have to find what works best for you. That doesn't mean that GMail is bad - it just means that is isn't going to be the best because someone says that it is the best.